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  • Pier – Residencies for Black Artists
    by Sheree McKay on July 8, 2020 at 3:45 pm

    As part of their Re-Imagine Europe programme, Lighthouse has developed a ‘residency at home’ series awarding support for three black artists. This is an opportunity for artists, practitioners, producers and technologists to expand their […]

  • Season for Change – Common Ground Commissions
    by Sheree McKay on June 22, 2020 at 3:52 pm

    Season for Change are delighted to launch Common Ground, a programme of four £10,000 commissions for artists, makers or creators, and a professional development programme focused on cultural climate leadership. Season for Change is a […]

  • Call for filmpro online commissions for disabled artists and mentors
    by Sheree McKay on June 17, 2020 at 9:41 am

    During lockdown creative production and exhibition has necessarily been moving onto online platforms. For some people it has been an easy transition, but many artists and audiences have found the experience either overwhelming or excluding.In […]

  • Jerwood/FVU Awards 2022
    by Sheree McKay on June 12, 2020 at 9:59 am

    The Jerwood/FVU Awards 2022 are a major opportunity for UK-based moving-image artists in the first five years of developing their professional practice. Jerwood Arts and Film and Video Umbrella invite early-career artists to make proposals for […]

  • How to be together again – Residencies at home
    by Sheree McKay on June 3, 2020 at 2:06 pm

    Deptford X is pleased to offer 6 one month paid residency opportunities for artists, writers and/or thinkers to begin developing work or research on the subject of ‘how to be together again’. With talk of ‘returning to […]


Hyperallergic Sensitive to Art & its Discontents


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  • Bill Nye Shows How Face Masks Actually Protect You–and Why You Should Wear Them
    by Colin Marshall on July 10, 2020 at 5:00 pm

    Like many Americans of my generation, I grew up having things explained to me by Bill Nye. Flight, magnets, simple machines, volcanoes: there seemed to be nothing he and his team of young lieutenants couldn't break down in a clear, humorous, and wholly non-boring manner. He didn't ask us to come to him, but met Bill Nye Shows How Face Masks Actually Protect You–and Why You Should Wear Them is a post from: Open Culture. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google Plus, or get our Daily Email. And don't miss our big collections of Free Online Courses, Free Online Movies, Free eBooks, Free Audio Books, Free Foreign Language Lessons, and MOOCs.

  • A Free Stanford Course on How to Teach Online: Designed for Middle & High School Teachers (July 13 – 17)
    by OC on July 10, 2020 at 2:00 pm

    This fall, many teachers (across the country and the world) will be asked to teach online--something most teachers have never done before. To assist with that transition, the Stanford Online High School and Stanford Continuing Studies have teamed up to offer a free online course called Teaching Your Class Online: The Essentials. Taught by veteran A Free Stanford Course on How to Teach Online: Designed for Middle & High School Teachers (July 13 – 17) is a post from: Open Culture. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google Plus, or get our Daily Email. And don't miss our big collections of Free Online Courses, Free Online Movies, Free eBooks, Free Audio Books, Free Foreign Language Lessons, and MOOCs.

  • Bisa Butler’s Beautiful Quilted Portraits of Frederick Douglass, Nina Simone, Jean-Michel Basquiat & More
    by Ayun Halliday on July 10, 2020 at 8:00 am

    Fiber artist Bisa Butler’s quilted portraits of Black Americans gain extra power from their medium. Each work is comprised of many scraps, carefully cut and positioned after hours of research and preliminary sketches. Velvet and silk nestle against bits of vintage flour sacks, West African wax print fabric, denim and, occasionally, hand-me-downs from the sitter’s own Bisa Butler’s Beautiful Quilted Portraits of Frederick Douglass, Nina Simone, Jean-Michel Basquiat & More is a post from: Open Culture. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google Plus, or get our Daily Email. And don't miss our big collections of Free Online Courses, Free Online Movies, Free eBooks, Free Audio Books, Free Foreign Language Lessons, and MOOCs.

  • An Introduction to Jean Baudrillard, Who Predicted the Simulation-Like Reality in Which We Live
    by Colin Marshall on July 9, 2020 at 2:00 pm

    Each and every morning, many of us wake up and immediately check on what's happening in the world. Sometimes these events stir emotions within us, and occasionally we act on those emotions, which raise in us a desire to affect the world ourselves. But does this entire ritual involve anything real? While performing it we An Introduction to Jean Baudrillard, Who Predicted the Simulation-Like Reality in Which We Live is a post from: Open Culture. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google Plus, or get our Daily Email. And don't miss our big collections of Free Online Courses, Free Online Movies, Free eBooks, Free Audio Books, Free Foreign Language Lessons, and MOOCs.

  • Watch the Famous James Baldwin-William F. Buckley Debate in Full, With Restored Audio (1965)
    by Josh Jones on July 9, 2020 at 11:00 am

    When James Baldwin took the stage to debate William F. Buckley at Cambridge in 1965, it was to have “a debate we shouldn’t need,” writes Gabrielle Bellot at Literary Hub, and yet it’s one that is still “as important as ever.” The proposition before the two men—famed prophetic novelist of the black experience in America Watch the Famous James Baldwin-William F. Buckley Debate in Full, With Restored Audio (1965) is a post from: Open Culture. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google Plus, or get our Daily Email. And don't miss our big collections of Free Online Courses, Free Online Movies, Free eBooks, Free Audio Books, Free Foreign Language Lessons, and MOOCs.

  • Buddhist Monk Covers Judas Priest’s “Breaking the Law,” Then Breaks Into Meditation
    by OC on July 9, 2020 at 8:00 am

    Back in April, we introduced you to Kossan, a Japanese Buddhist monk who has a penchant for performing covers of rock anthems--everything from The Ramones’ “Teenage Lobotomy,” to “Queen’s “We Will Rock You” and The Beatles’ “Yellow Submarine.” Now he returns with Judas Priest's "Breaking the Law." It's a curious cover, not least because he Buddhist Monk Covers Judas Priest’s “Breaking the Law,” Then Breaks Into Meditation is a post from: Open Culture. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google Plus, or get our Daily Email. And don't miss our big collections of Free Online Courses, Free Online Movies, Free eBooks, Free Audio Books, Free Foreign Language Lessons, and MOOCs.

  • Does Every Picture Tell a Story? A Conversation with Artist Joseph Watson for Pretty Much Pop: A Culture Podcast #51
    by Mark Linsenmayer on July 9, 2020 at 7:01 am

    Storytelling is an essential part of Las Vegas artist Joseph Watson's painting methodology, whether he's creating city scenes or public sculpture or children's illustrations. So how does the narrative an author may have in mind affect the viewer, and is this different for different types of art? Joseph is perhaps best known as the illustrator Does Every Picture Tell a Story? A Conversation with Artist Joseph Watson for Pretty Much Pop: A Culture Podcast #51 is a post from: Open Culture. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google Plus, or get our Daily Email. And don't miss our big collections of Free Online Courses, Free Online Movies, Free eBooks, Free Audio Books, Free Foreign Language Lessons, and MOOCs.

  • Explore the Beautiful Pages of the 1902 Japanese Design Magazine Shin-Bijutsukai: European Modernism Meets Traditional Japanese Design
    by Josh Jones on July 8, 2020 at 6:00 pm

    We read much about the role of Japanism in the art of late 19th Europe and North America. “The craze for all things Japanese,” writes the Art Institute of Chicago, “was launched in 1854 when American Commodore Matthew Perry forced Japan to recommence international trade after two centuries of virtual isolation.” Britain, the Continent, and Explore the Beautiful Pages of the 1902 Japanese Design Magazine <i>Shin-Bijutsukai</i>: European Modernism Meets Traditional Japanese Design is a post from: Open Culture. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google Plus, or get our Daily Email. And don't miss our big collections of Free Online Courses, Free Online Movies, Free eBooks, Free Audio Books, Free Foreign Language Lessons, and MOOCs.

  • A Chilling Time-Lapse Video Documents Every COVID-19 Death on a Global Map: From January to June 2020
    by Josh Jones on July 8, 2020 at 2:00 pm

    The story of the Coronavirus, at least in the US, has swung between a number of rhetorical tics now common to all of our discourse. Called a “hoax,” then given several racist nicknames and dismissed as a “nothing burger,” the pandemic—currently at around 3 million cases in the country, with a U.S. death toll over A Chilling Time-Lapse Video Documents Every COVID-19 Death on a Global Map: From January to June 2020 is a post from: Open Culture. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google Plus, or get our Daily Email. And don't miss our big collections of Free Online Courses, Free Online Movies, Free eBooks, Free Audio Books, Free Foreign Language Lessons, and MOOCs.

  • Salvador Dalí Explains Why He Was a “Bad Painter” and Contributed “Nothing” to Art (1986)
    by Colin Marshall on July 8, 2020 at 8:00 am

    Not so very long ago, Salvador Dalí was the most famous living painter in the world. When the BBC's Arena came to shoot an episode about him in 1986, they asked him what that exalted state felt like. "I don't know if I am the most famous painter in the world," Dalí responds, "because lots of the Salvador Dalí Explains Why He Was a “Bad Painter” and Contributed “Nothing” to Art (1986) is a post from: Open Culture. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Google Plus, or get our Daily Email. And don't miss our big collections of Free Online Courses, Free Online Movies, Free eBooks, Free Audio Books, Free Foreign Language Lessons, and MOOCs.


Enlightenment in the East of England